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LION'S MANE MUSHROOM

Lion_s-Mane-Duo-without-shadow
THE GIST

OVERVIEW

Lion’s Mane (the more common name of Hericium erinaceus) is a fungus class used for improving general health and cognitive performance. Various studies suggest that Lion’s Mane has neuroprotective and neuroregenerative properties.

An edible mushroom native to North America and Asia, the Lion’s Mane mushroom is popular in traditional Chinese medicine for its neuroenhancing properties. A large body of research has been assembled on the Lion’s Mane mushroom’s ability to protect existing nerve cells and generate new neural connections in the brain. In several double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled trials, it significantly improved overall cognitive function.

SYNONYMS

OTHER COMMON NAMES

Hericium Erinaceus, Yamabushitake, Lion’s Mane, Monkey’s head, Houtou (infrequent), Igelstachelbart, Pom Pom Blanc, Hedgehog Mushroom, Satyr’s beard.

IN A NUTSHELL

TOP BENEFITS

Neuroprotection

Neuroregeneration

Neurogenesis 

DEFINITION

WHAT IS LION'S MANE?

Lion’s Mane is a unique mushroom that supports brain health. Lion’s Mane supplies active nootropics called hericenones and erinacines. Clinical research suggests that Lion’s Mane stimulates Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) production, which may help with neural regeneration and myelin nerve sheath synthesis [1]. Optimised NGF supports brain plasticity for storing new information, i.e., learning and memory, and promoting robust brain cell replication and healthy brain cell membrane function.

Lion’s Mane mushroom is a promising compound for combating anxiety symptoms as it can decrease feelings of depression [2] and can help prevent some aspects of cognitive decline [3]. This medicinal mushroom can also improve neurogenesis and act as a neuroprotective compound [4, 5].

Lion’s Mane is also an immune booster with healthy adults and those who have cancer [6]. Beyond the brain benefits of Lion’s Mane, there are many other heart and cholesterol-related enhancements, making this a general health tonic in many traditional cultures.

The main cognitive benefits of Lion’s Mane are related to anxiety, depression, and the prevention of cognitive decline, i.e., neuroprotection. In one four-week study, doses of Lion’s Mane were given to 30 participants and found significant improvements in feelings of anxiety and depression [6].

In the long-term, Lion’s Mane has been linked to significant cognitive improvements that declined after ingestion stopped [7].

lion's-mane-graph

Aside from anxiety, Lion’s Mane can improve cognitive performance. A 16-week trial of fifty 80-year-olds showed improvements in their cognitive abilities with Lion’s Mane mushroom [8]. While this study shows neuroprotection evidence, it also contains compelling evidence on the brain’s positive interactions. For example, the Lion’s Mane mushroom can increase Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) expression in some brain regions, such as the hippocampus [1].

This increase in NGF can support neurogenesis and general cognitive health. It may even be able to help the regrowth of neurons after injury [1]. This doesn’t mean anyone with brain injuries will recover, but it is a theoretical possibility.

What is most interesting about these Lion’s Mane mushroom benefits is how they correlate together; neurogenesis – the growth of new brain cells – is supposed to reduce anxiety and depression effectively. A Lion’s Mane mushroom extract can increase nerve-growth, and studies suggest it reduces stress. One potential cause for reduced anxiety and depression is the increased neurogenesis of the Lion’s Mane mushroom.

SOURCE

MARCO'S GROUNDS LION'S MANE SOURCING

Marco’s Grounds uses full-spectrum Lion’s Mane sourced from organic, non-GMO, gluten-free, vegan, family-owned farms in the United States of America.

Our raw Lion’s Mane then goes to the extraction lab, where the active ingredients are extracted (Beta-Glucans, standardized at 40%).

From there, our Lion’s Mane comes to Switzerland, where it is prepared along our other essential ingredients to make MAXIMUM MIND®.

DOSING

LION'S MANE DOSING PRINCIPLES AND RATIONALE

Lion’s Mane has shown tremendous cognitive benefits for doses ranging from 500 to 1000 mg/day. Amounts of 3000 mg/day have been used in some clinical studies with no observed increase in cognitive benefits [9]. Marco’s Grounds believes the evidence suggests a threshold response (see Marco’s Grounds Dosing Philosophy) when Lion’s Mane is given to healthy people. This means that more might not be better under all circumstances. 

In general, Marco’s Grounds experience with Lion’s Mane indicates that when used as part of a comprehensive cognitive-enhancing complex, a more modest dose is often sufficient.

In general, the best time to take Lion’s Mane is early in the day.

lion's mane ROLE IN OUR FORMULATION

FOCUS
33.3%
MEMORY
100%
CLARITY
33.3%
MOOD
66.6%

Lion's Mane DEEP DIVE

MAXIMUM-MIND-3D-view-large

MAXIMUM MIND®

Clinically Studied

Pharmaceutical Grade Cognitive and Mind Enhancing Complex
Made in Switzerland

References

  1. Wong, K. H., Naidu, M., David, P., Abdulla, M. A., Abdullah, N., Kuppusamy, U. R., & Sabaratnam, V. (2011). Peripheral Nerve Regeneration Following Crush Injury to Rat Peroneal Nerve by Aqueous Extract of Medicinal Mushroom Hericium erinaceus (Bull.: Fr) Pers. (Aphyllophoromycetideae). Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM, 2011, 580752.
  2. Nagano, M., Shimizu, K., Kondo, R., Hayashi, C., Sato, Lion’ sitagawa, K., & Ohnuki, K. (2010). Reduction of depression and anxiety by 4 weeks Hericium erinaceus intake. Biomedical research (Tokyo, Japan), 31(4), 231–237.
  3. Mori, K., Inatomi, S., Ouchi, K., Azumi, Y., & Tuchida, T. (2009). Improving effects of the mushroom Yamabushitake (Hericium erinaceus) on mild cognitive impairment: a double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial. Phytotherapy research : PTR, 23(3), 367–372.
  4. Moldavan, M., Grygansky, A. P., Kolotushkina, O. V., Kirchhoff, B., Skibo, G. G., & Pedarzani, P. (2007). Neurotropic and trophic action of lion’s mane mushroom Hericium erinaceus (Bull.: Fr.) Pers. (Aphyllophoromycetideae) extracts on nerve cells in vitro. International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms, 9(1).
  5. Zusso, M., Debetto, P., Guidolin, D., & Giusti, P. (2004). Cerebellar granular cell cultures as an in vitro model for antidepressant drug-induced neurogenesis. Critical Reviews in Neurobiology, 16(1&2).
  6. Nagano, M., Shimizu, K., Kondo, R., Hayashi, C., Sato, D., Kitagawa, K., & Ohnuki, K. (2010). Reduction of anxiety by 4 weeks Hericium erinaceus intake. Biomedical research (Tokyo, Japan), 31(4), 231–237.
  7. Res, P. (2009). Mar; 23 (3): 367-72. Improving effects of the mushroom Yamabushitake (Hericium erinaceus) on mild cognitive impairment: a double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial. Mori K, 1.
  8. Mori, K., Inatomi, S., Ouchi, K., Azumi, Y., & Tuchida, T. (2009). Improving effects of the mushroom Yamabushitake (Hericium erinaceus) on mild cognitive impairment: a double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial. Phytotherapy research : PTR, 23(3), 367–372.
  9. Younis, N. A. A. K. Y. (2020). Online Survey for Patient Outcomes on Hericium Erinaceous Mushroom. Pharmacognosy Journal, 12(3).